The premier resource for tracing your British and Irish ancestors
Prerogative & Exchequer Courts of York - Latin probate index entries

For the years 1731-33, there are a substantial number of index entries written in Latin – around 50% or more of these entries. While the structure of these entries is the same as for all the English entries, the words used are different and, most importantly, the spelling of forenames is different.

Latinised forenames
The Latinised forenames have been converted to their English equivalents for searching the British Origins database, but be aware that what you will see in the original entries may be a little different. In most cases there is not much difference between the Latinised version and the usual version, but this is not always the case, as the table below indicates. The Latinised versions are frequently abbreviated, but this is the case with all forenames.
(NB The Latinised names below appear generally to have genitive case endings, but some of the case endings are unexpected, and a few appear to be incorrect – but that's how they appear in the manuscript index entries.)

Latin Usual
Abelis Abel
Abigaelis Abigail
Abrahami
Abrahamis
Abraham
Adami Adam
Agneti [sic] Agnes
Alexandri Alexander
Alica
Alicia
Alice
Ambrosij Ambrose
Anna Ann(e)
Anna
Andrei Andrew
Anthonij Anthony
Arthuri Arthur
Barnardi Barnard
Benjamani
Benjamini
Benjaminis
Benjamin
Bernardi Bernard
Briani Brian
Caroli Charles
Christoferi
Chroferi
Christopher
Cornelij
Conlij
Cornelius
Cuthberti Cuthbert
Danielis Daniel
Davidis David
Edmundi Edmund
Edvardi
Edwardi
Edward
Egidij Giles
Emanuelis Emanuel
Esthera Esther
Franci
Francisci
Francis
Francissia Frances
Gabrielis Gabriel
Galfridi Geoffrey
Godfrey
Georgij George
Gervasij Gervase
Gracia Grace
Gualteri Walter
Guidonis Guy
Gul
Gulmi
Gulielmi
William
Hellena Helen
Hellen
Henric
Henrici
Henry
Hugonis Hugo
Humphredi Humphrey
Isaaci Isaac
Israelis Israel
Jacobi James
Jacob
NB. Usually James, but you cannot be certain.
Jervasij Jervase
Johanis
Johis
Johnis
John
Jonathanis
Jothanis
Jonathan
Josephi Joseph
Juditha Juditha
Laurentij Laurence
Lawrence
Leonardi Leonard
Ludovici Louis
Marmaduci Marmaduke
Martini Martin
Matthai
Mathai
Matthei
Mathew
Matthias
Mercia Mercy
Michaelis
Michis
Michael
Milonis Miles
Nathanielis Nathaniel
Nathanis Nathan
Nicholai
Nicolai
Nicholas
Nicolas
Oliveri Oliver
Patricij Patrick
Philippi
Phillippi
Philip
Phillip
Rachaelis Rachael
Radulphi Ralph
Reginaldi Reginald
Richardi
Richi
Rici
Richard
Roberti
Robti
Robert
Rogeri
Rogeris
Roger
Samlis
Samuelis
Samuel
Simonis Simon
Solomonis Solomon
Stephani Stephen
Sylvani Sylvanus
Thoma Thomas
Timothei
Timothi
Timothy
Tobia Toby
Tobias
Latinised dates
The table below shows the Latin and English versions. There are various abbreviations of the Latin names, and in some cases in the original the English month name is used anyway.

Latin English
Janij, Janrij, Januarij JAN
Febrij FEB
Martij MAR
Aprilis APR
Maij MAY
Junij JUN
Julij JUL
Augti AUG
Octobris OCT
Parish

In Latin entries the parish name is usually preceded by 'de' rather than 'of', eg:

In the second entry above, the last word is an abbreviation for 'eadem', which means 'the same'. So this person is also of the parish of Sawdon, Rydale.

In the first entry below, means Parish.,
ie the entry in English would read '...of Ealand Parish of Hallifax.'

The second entry would read '...Newsome P. [= Parish of] Almondbury.'

The abbreviation for parish is slightly different here:

Miscellaneous Latin words & abbreviations

'Com' This may appear instead of County or Co, as here:

In the above case, the name of the county has also been latinicised (to Middlesexia); it is clearly Middlesex.

'Ebor' Where this appears, it means York, as here (17310511737050002):

In the above example, Latin 'Civit[as]. & Dioc. Ebor' means City and Diocese of York.

The next example refers to City and Province of York, so the use of Latin does not imply any more consistency than when English is used.

'eadem' = the same: means that the place is the same as in the previous entry: Example:

The final word above is 'eadem', abbreviated.

'et al. fil.' ('et alii filii') = and other children: as here:

'fil' = son (filius) or daughter (filia). Example:

Here 'fil Gulmi' is short for filius Gulielmi = son of William.

'Insula' = island, as here:

ie the place is Sunk Island in Humber.

'nuper' (often abbreviated 'nup.') = lately, ie refers to where the deceased had lived.

'sup' In many place names you will find 'sup', eg Kingston sup Hull, Newton sup Darwent, as in the examples below (from 17310511737050001). 'Sup' is an abbreviation for 'super' = English 'on'.

'vide' = see




Borthwick Institute for Archives
The York Series of Probate Indexes are presented in association with the Borthwick Institute for Archives